July 25, 2018 | Posted in Homosexuality, LGBT | By

Our friends at the Colson Center for Christian Worldview have released a thoughtful commentary explaining why some Christians fall for LGBT arguments: they aren’t really arguments at all. Instead, Christians are asked to put experiences and feelings ahead of God’s timeless word.

John Stonestreet writes,

Recently, the Human Rights Campaign released a so-called “faith guide” that offers a glaring example of just this kind of thinking. It’s full of the same bad “arguments” that are trotted out over and over. Even so, they’re worth discussing because people are still falling for them.

HRC’s new guide is entitled “Coming Home to Evangelicalism and Self,” and purportedly offers ways to “help LGBTQ people live fully in their sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, and to live fully in their religious, spiritual and cultural traditions.” The guide says that LGBTQ Christians “find it difficult to be fully themselves in their church communities. They may have been taught that sexual or romantic relationships that are not heterosexual are sinful…Yet those same LGBTQ people of faith know deep within that they were born this way.”

Notice the wording there: “…be fully themselves.” … “they know deep within they were born this way.” No argument is made; no scriptural reasoning is offered. Right out of the gate, this pamphlet, timed to coincide with the largest gathering of progressive evangelicals in the country, assumes what it needs to prove. . . .

In the pamphlet, a woman who describes herself as a lesbian Christian says she had an “encounter with God,” and that He told her “You’re gay. I made you this way…This is who you are.” She was shocked to find that her church wasn’t buying this. “[T]hey wanted to know how I could scripturally justify what I was telling them,” she says. “They didn’t care so much about this spiritual encounter I’d had with God.” But isn’t that the same thing we ask of Mormons or Muslims or cult leaders who justify explicitly anti-biblical stances based on their experiences?

You can read or listen to Stonestreet’s entire commentary here.

Jerry is the founder and president of Family Council. He began Family Council in 1989 after a successful effort to amend the Arkansas Constitution to prevent the use of public funds for abortions. He and his wife reside in Little Rock. They have four sons.