Jerry is the founder and president of Family Council. He began Family Council in 1989 after a successful effort to amend the Arkansas Constitution to prevent the use of public funds for abortions. He and his wife reside in Little Rock. They have four sons.

A.G. Rejects Another Recreational Marijuana Measure

November 16, 2017 | Posted in Marijuana | By

Last week Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge rejected yet another attempt to legalize “recreational” marijuana in Arkansas.

The A.G.’s office said there were “fundamental defects in the submission” that prevented the measure from being approved. By our count, her office has rejected twelve similar measures since May of this year.

I hope you will thank Attorney General Rutledge for continuing to reject these flawed marijuana measures. You can call her office at 501-682-2007 or email oag@ArkansasAG.gov.

As we have said before: So-called “medical marijuana” is just a stepping stone. The endgame for marijuana’s supporters is — and always has been — full legalization.

You can read the A.G.’s full opinion here.

AR Lottery Gives Scholarships 14 Cents of Every Dollar in October

November 15, 2017 | Posted in Arkansas Lottery | By

Last week the Arkansas Lottery released its monthly report detailing revenue and expenses for October.

The Lottery reportedly took in $39.8 million, but paid less than $5.7 million to scholarships — about 14.2% of the Lottery’s revenue for the month.

Overall, the Arkansas Lottery’s income is higher than it was this time last year. Lottery revenue is up nearly $22 million compared to 2016, but scholarship funding has risen by only $2.8 million.

As we have said for years: The Arkansas Lottery’s problem is not income; it’s priorities. The Lottery needs to prioritize scholarship funding. As it stands, students get a pathetic 17 cents of every dollar the Lottery makes.

Below is a breakdown of Lottery revenue so far this fiscal year.

Month Gross Lottery Revenue Paid to Scholarships % Gross Revenue
July $ 36,885,396.81 $ 6,661,762.99 18.1%
August 49,320,459.23 8,912,741.54 18.1%
September 36,405,731.14 6,755,333.93 18.6%
October 39,802,740.53 5,667,305.74 14.2%
Total $ 162,414,327.71 $ 27,997,144.20 17.2%

Where Do the Pro-Life Lawsuits Stand?

November 15, 2017 | Posted in Abortion | By

This week we learned an appeals court will not reconsider a decision that lets Arkansas cut Medicaid funds to Planned Parenthood.

If you’re having trouble keeping track of all the different pro-life lawsuits in play right now, you aren’t alone. Here’s a breakdown of where things stand:

  1. Abortion-Inducing Drugs Safety Act: This good law requires abortion drugs to be dispensed according to FDA protocols and requires abortion clinics to contract with a doctor who has hospital admitting privileges. It’s been upheld at the federal Eighth Circuit, but Planned Parenthood is appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  2. Medicaid Funding: In 2015 Arkansas cut Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood. A panel of judges ruled the state can do that; Planned Parenthood appealed to the entire Eighth Circuit. The Eighth Circuit has decided not to reconsider the case.
  3. Dismemberment Abortion: In 2017 the legislature prohibited dismemberment abortions. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker blocked the law. Attorney General Rutledge has asked the Eighth Circuit to overturn that decision.
  4. Sex-Selection Abortion: In 2017 the legislature passed a law prohibiting abortions performed due to the baby’s sex. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker blocked the law. Attorney General Rutledge has asked the Eighth Circuit to overturn that decision.
  5. Reporting Requirements: In 2017 the Arkansas Legislature amended some of the reporting requirements for abortions performed on teen girls. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker blocked the law. Attorney General Rutledge has asked the Eighth Circuit to overturn that decision.
  6. Prohibiting Buying and Selling of Aborted Babies: In 2017 the legislature passed a law generally preventing people from using aborted babies for scientific research and requiring aborted babies to be respectfully cremated or buried. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker blocked the law. Attorney General Rutledge has asked the Eighth Circuit to overturn that decision.
  7. Clinic Inspections: In 2017 the legislature passed a law ensuring any clinic that fails a health inspection will stop doing abortions immediately. A lawsuit is pending regarding the law, but no ruling has been issued.