Lawsuit Shows Importance of Lower Courts, Government Offices

U.S. District Judge Lee Rudofsky (above) is presiding over the case.

With the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last week, all eyes turn to the U.S. Supreme Court and the race for the presidency this November.

Every time a seat on the nation’s high court is vacated, Americans are reminded of a simple fact: Elections really do have consequences.

That’s especially true of presidential elections, because the president is responsible for nominating federal judges and appointing men and women to lead government agencies.

There’s no denying that the U.S. Supreme Court has tremendous power. But the truth is the nation’s district courts and appeals courts arguably are just as important — if not more so.

For example, right now the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is suing a Kroger store in Conway, Arkansas over alleged religious discrimination.

According a complaint the EEOC filed last week, the Kroger store disciplined — and eventually fired — two employees who declined to wear a rainbow insignia on their store aprons.

The rainbow insignia is widely understood to be a symbol of gay pride, and the two employees both profess to be Christians who object to homosexual behavior.

The U.S. government’s lawsuit against the store argues that discipling and firing the employees ultimately amounts to religious discrimination under federal law.

The case is currently before U.S. District Judge Lee Rudofsky.

President Trump nominated Judge Rudofsky in July of 2019, and the U.S. Senate confirmed him last November.

Judge Rudofsky no doubt will give the case a very fair hearing.

It’s difficult to imagine the Obama Administration’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission taking up a case like this one a few years ago.

From 2013 – 2016, the Obama Administration issued directive after directive promoting a pro-LGBT agenda — often at the expense of religious liberty.

The Trump Administration’s EEOC is standing up for religious liberty in this lawsuit, and one of President Trump’s judicial nominees is presiding over the case.

This lawsuit may never land before the U.S. Supreme Court, but it still could impact how businesses in America treat their employees’ religious beliefs and how future courts handle religious discrimination cases.

Cases like these often don’t get the attention they deserve, but they can affect Americans for years to come.

Video: Federal Government Sues Arkansas Kroger Over Religious Discrimination

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit last week against a Kroger store in Conway that allegedly fired two employees who declined to wear rainbow insignia at work.

According to the lawsuit, the employees considered the emblem a symbol of gay pride, and could not wear it in light of their Christian faith.

Watch this video to learn more.

Federal Government Sues Conway Kroger For Religious Discrimination

Last week the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced it has filed a lawsuit against a Kroger store in Conway over religious discrimination against two employees.

The lawsuit centers on two employees who were fired after they declined to wear a rainbow-colored heart at work; rainbow insignia generally are worn to show support for LGBT causes and lifestyles.

The EEOC writes,

According to the EEOC’s suit, the Conway Kroger implemented a new dress code, which included an apron depicting a rainbow-colored heart emblem on the bib of the apron. The women believed the emblem endorsed LGBTQ values and that wearing it would violate their religious beliefs. According to the EEOC, one woman offered to wear the apron with the emblem covered and the other offered to wear a different apron without the emblem, but the company made no attempt to accommodate their requests. When the women still refused to wear the apron with the emblem visible, the EEOC charged, Kroger retaliated against them by disciplining and ultimately discharging them.

Such alleged conduct violates the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEOC filed suit in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas, Central Division, Civil Action No. 4:20-cv-01099, after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process. The suit seeks monetary relief in the form of back pay and compensatory damages, as well as an injunction against future discrimination.                       

The Kroger store in question is the one located at 855 Salem Rd, Conway, AR 72034.

In recent years we’ve seen a number of major corporations try to use their influence to advance the LGBT agenda.

For example:

In 2014 Chase Bank surveyed its employees’ loyalty to LGBT causes.

In 2015 Kroger announced it soon would begin offering “trans-inclusive” employment benefits.

The following year, Target unveiled a new policy to let men use women’s restrooms — and vice versa — in its stores. Walgreens rolled out a similar policy in 2018.

And last year Gilette released a pro-transgender ad that ended up costing the company an estimated $8 billion in lost sales.

In the midst of all of this, it’s good to see the federal government taking a stand for religious liberty right here in Arkansas.

You can read the EEOC’s press release about the lawsuit here.